Roundup: Protecting women in conflict and disasters

Humanitarian crises have a disproportionate effect on women and girls. Not only are they 2.5 times more likely to drop out of school or lose their jobs in emergency situations, but they also have to shoulder the majority of the burden of supporting family members.

When legal and social structures break down, women and girls are also more likely to face violence and discrimination.

According to UN Women, more than 70 percent of women in crisis situations have experienced some form of gender-based violence. This can be assault or exploitation, but it can also take the form of increased domestic abuse or cultural practices like early marriage.

Yet, a recent report by the International Rescue Committee found that only 0.2 percent of humanitarian funding between 2016 and 2018 went towards preventing or addressing gender-based violence. This leaves women and girls especially vulnerable, and can limit their access to aid and other necessary services.

Leadership positions in the humanitarian sector are also more likely to be held by men. A February 2019 report showed that only about one third of the UN's humanitarian coordinators were women.

Here's a collection of our recent reporting on how women and girls are affected by crises around the world.

Source: The New Humanitatian

Releated

19 Killed in Attack on Mali Army Base Near Mauritania Border

BAMAKO – Armed men attacked an army camp in Mali near the border with Mauritania, killing 19 soldiers Sunday, the armed forces said.The camp in Sokolo in the Segou region remains under control by Malian Armed Forces, and the provisional toll includes f…