Aga Khan University Offers Medical Services (allAfrica.com)

Aga Khan University in collaboration with Uganda Heart Institute(UHI) , Uganda Cancer Institute (UCI)and other cooperate companies operating in Uganda have launched Family Medical camp which will see over 15000 Ugandans getting free medical examination and treatment for Non Communicable and general diseases .

Aga Khan University center manager Martha osiro said the camp will focus more on hear t and cancer diseases whom she said the two diseases are major challenges to the health sector in the country, yet people suffering from them cannot afford to meet the cost of medication to treat the illness.

“Heart and Cancer diseases are claiming many people’s lives in Uganda to day and in spite of them being curable many people find out when it’s too late that is why we are coming up with the medical camp to see that we reach out to many Ugandans to adopt the culture of medical checkup and if detected in early stages these diseases can be treated” she explained.

During the camp women will be screened for breast and cervix cancer yet men will be screened for prostate cancer which medical doctors say it’s becoming leading killer among the aging population in the country.

The 2015 family health camp will be at Acacia mall in Kamwokya city suburb of Kampala city and it will commence on the 21st to 23rdAugust 2015.The 2015 Family Medical camp is the second of its own to be organized by the University Hospital, the first one was held in 2014 and it saw over 5000 Ugandans getting free medication.

According to the World Health Organization reports cervical cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer among the Women, and the biggest challenge in Uganda most of these Women are diagnosed at advanced stage of cancer which associated with poor out comes this makes it very complicated for the medical personnel’s to work on such patients thus leading to massive death of women due to cervix cancer.

Dr Noleb Mugisha the Head of comprehensive Community cancer Programme at the UCI told the East African Business Week that if such medical camps are organized and embraced by the communities this can reduce the percentage of Ugandan suffering from cancer he said cancer is curable diseases but the general public still have negative perception about the chances of getting cured.

“At UCI we have tried to sensitize the community through our community public outreach but the challenge the staff at the institute we are very few thus impending the few oncologist to reach every part of the country however with this partnership with Aga Khan University hospital to have this family medical camp will help the Institute to reach wider group pf people “he said.

However he warned Men against shying away cancer screening, he said Men also are more vulnerable to cancer especially cancer of prostate. Mugisha explained that every year more than 150 men patients are diagnosed with cancer of the prostate glands.

The 2015 Family camp has received support from various organization that have come on board to support the camp, some of the corporate ranges from Telecom to multibillion pharmaceutical companies which have donated drugs and vaccines to treat Ugandan diagnosed with cancer, heart and other disease.

Gittoes Pharmaceuticals Limited chief marketing manager .Ramaprasad .Srinidhi told East African Business Week that his company will donate drugs and vaccination valued at Ush 10 million or USD 2857 to support the Organizers of the family Medical camp he said the drugs will support those with heart , cancer and other general diseases .

He said drugs for cardiology related complications are very expensive on the local market yet there many Ugandans especially babies who are need of such drugs for them to survive that is why the pharmaceutical company had to come in and support the camp.

Media reports Indicates that one percent of 1.6 million babies born every in Uganda , about 16,000 have heart related defects at birth of the 16,000 at least 50% of these babies require corrective surgeries to live meaning full life. But before such children operated they need supportive drugs to support them before and after the surgery.