PAGE MENU
CATEGORY MENU

A musical and dance journey through East Africa

A Ugandan night would be incomplete without energetic dances fused with songs. Ndere Centre’s amphitheatre is a colourful showcase of 60 cultural dances.

Sweaty, creative and agile young ladies and gentlemen will let you “glee” not for anything but because in your seat, you will travel around Uganda through assorted dances and songs. The performances call for good team work. There are the drummers, many because there are different types of drums which come in various sizes too, and dully produce varying sounds.

In the same group are those engrossed in plucking adungus while other make use of their lips to produce music through wooden flutes.

For some performances, dancers play a dual role, dancing and sounding shakers tied to their legs. Clapping comes in to complement the melody produced from instruments.

Outstanding among these is the extra-long local trumpet from West Nile. To this, are thematic songs that celebrate love, to which are dramatic illustrations to portray dating in the traditional African setting.

The dances

Two catchy dances. One of the Gishu, a tribe in Eastern Uganda, and another is one of the Karamojong, who live further in North East. The dance portrays Gishu ladies as agile and not easy to win over. A man will have to toil to get a woman say yes to their aances.

It is the same for the Karamojong. Their courtship dance is an energetic one. Karamojong ladies are a hard nut to crack. They are strong and will let different men vying to win their hearts dance hard, jump high, run in circles and more. It’s a labour of love!

But then some dances preach social change and others celebrate the bright side of life, like Ndore from Rwanda, which is characterised with footwork and thumping on melodic rhythm. These performances take place on Sunday, Wednesday and Friday evenings at Ndere Centre.

rbatte@ug.nationmedia.com

SOURCE: DAILY MONITOR

Related Post
The Deputy Speaker of Parliament, Jacob Oulanyah, says differences in opinions and beliefs have stalled
The Deputy Speaker of Parliament, Jacob Oulanyah, says differences in opinions and beliefs have stalled
The Speaker of Parliament, Rebecca Kadaga, has expressed concern over allegations of torture by the

Comments are closed.