The workplace Beware of office PhD syndrome

You report to work daily. Together with a team, you work to ensure company targets are met. Sometimes, you are too busy to have meals until office assignments are completed.
Ostensibly, you have mastered the art of success, but to the dismay of some of your colleagues.
The workplace presents a mix of characters with different a background and agenda. Therefore, your success will not necessary attract kudos. There are those who will be quick at criticising not because they care that much about the progress of the organisation but simply because they are envious of your contribution and thus want to fail you. If you have not yet met any resistance at work don’t aspire.
When you are appointed into a position of higher authority just know that not all team members will gladly accept your policies. Even at the same level of engagement, confrontations will always arise. Commonly, dislikes result from mere misunderstandings to personal development. Why are you ever smiling? How come you never hang out with us? These are some of the common questions colleagues can use to probe your personal character.
It is natural to be hated but worse if your policies seem opaque. Therefore, foes will employ all means to fail you under the loosely translated pull him or her down (PhD) syndrome.
In extreme cases, they will openly rubbish your policies, sabotage plans and blackmail you to ensure you are failed and thus out of the picture.
If you are wondering how you can overcome, adopt these helpful tips: start by trying to be calm.
Understand the key issues and address each issue professionally with the aggrieved members. Remain focussed and don’t take sides. Above all, do your work well not to give room for incompetence. If necessary, refer the matter to your supervisor.

The writer is a human resources expert and a journalist. isaiahkitimbo@yahoo.com

SOURCE: Daily Monitor

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