Postponing Menstruation

When planning to go for a vacation, holidays, wedding or sports tournament, being in your best mood can make it more enjoyable but as you look ahead of these dates, you may realise this is the same time you will be having your menstrual periods. This may badly affect you as this is a time you have mood swings, abdominal pain, nausea and all sorts of discomfort.

Serious business
Before you laugh it off because it seems abnormal, Britain’s top ranked women’s tennis player, Heather Watson, 22, lost her first-round match because of what she called “girl things” that is, menstrual side effects .
“Almost every woman who experiences menstruation periods suffers from the premenstrual syndrome which may include nausea, abdominal or back pain, anxiety, irritability, mood swings and others,” says Dr Johnnie Mulwana a gynaecologist at Victoria Medical Services in Entebbe.

Working with the cycle
Around the 14th day after the previous menstruation period, ovulation occurs. The shell where the egg was produces a hormone called oestrogen and if no fertilisation takes place, it shrinks and the hormone runs out of circulation then passed out as menstrual blood.
With the pre-menstrual syndrome, many women would wish to delay their periods so they do not interfere with the days they want to be happy and here is how to do it.

How to do it right
According to Dr Joseph Nsengiyunva, a gynaecologist at Bethany Women’s Hospital in Luzira, “Planning to delay your periods is something you should start at least a week before you expect them. It is however important to seek aice from your doctor on the best alternative pills to use.”
One of the most common ways of delaying periods is by use of contraceptives. “If you have been taking pills, delaying periods is as easy as taking them even at the time you expect to have the periods,” aises Dr Mulwana.
“There are usually combined pills that contain both progesterone and oestrogen and these are basically for non-breastfeeding women. You have to skip the ‘inactive’ (brown) pills on the packet because they only help to replace the iron lost while you are in your periods. When the white pills are finished, continue with a new packet,” says Dr Nsengiyunva.
Caution
For breastfeeding mothers, it is important to know what type of pills to take. This is because there are pills that reduce the level of milk production especially those that contain Oestrogen hormone.
“Oestrogen-containing contraceptives have been linked to low milk supply and a shorter duration of breastfeeding. Progestin-only contraceptives are the preferred choice for breastfeeding mothers for both birth control and for purposes of delaying periods,” says Dr Mulwana.
In order to ensure effectiveness, seek proper prescription from a gynaecologist especially for those who are not using any contraceptives. Dr Mulwana adds, “If you are not on contraceptives, the doctor will aise that you take progesterone tablets three times a day starting at least three days before you expect your periods.”
For a woman using injectable contraceptives such as Injectaplan, one usually misses their periods and there is no need to take pills to delay their periods unless if they know that the injection lifespan is going to expire.
“Injectaplan has a very high dose of progesterone which remains hyperactive for 90 days so a woman on this method of family planning is not supposed to bleed before the three months elapse,” says Dr Nsengiyunva.
“Delaying periods is possible and there are no complications likely to occur because you will have your periods as soon as you stop taking the pills that were prescribed for you,” he adds.

editorial@ug.nationmedia.com

SOURCE: Daily Monitor

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