Hardships Refine Kitende Students

Whenever hardship strikes, people tend to wonder why God sent it and whether He loves them.

Pastor Ray Bentley, a US non-denominational preacher whose Calvary chapel teachings used to run on Power FM, often said hardships were God’s preparation for His plans for Christians, and even non-Christians. Bentley also said that hardships refine us. Like gold is refined through fire, human beings are improved upon through hardships.

God would, for instance, give parents a disabled child so that those parents become more compassionate towards the disabled. On November 18, Bentley’s assertions that hardships prepare and refine us were proven right. That day, students of St Mary’s Secondary School Kitende visited the Good Shepherd Home in Kisenyi and among the most striking images of that day was 15-year-old Howard Gamole reaching out to a girl with a neurological disorder.

With gentleness, he walked over to the little girl, caressed her cheek, and extended his hand in play. He tried to make the girl as comfortable as possible in her wheelchair while playing with her.

“One of my sisters has cerebral palsy so, these children feel like my brothers and sisters,” Gamole said when asked why he had sought out the little girl.

Another student, Sarah Nyangoma, said she was interested in the donation drive because she has a sister with a neurological disorder. She could not be dissuaded from seeing the children with neurological disorders. Told that she might get too emotionally affected on seeing them, Nyangoma passionately quipped: “I have to see these children.”

She felt that by reaching out to them, she would have reached out to her sister. The Good Shepherd home is one of the homes run by the Catholic Missionaries of the Poor. It has 200 residents, consisting of children and a few adults. Some of the residents have physical or neurological illnesses such as cerebral palsy, spinal disorders and hydrocephalus.

Kitende students overwhelmingly donated items that included scholastic materials, clothes, soap and foodstuffs. Brother Julius, who is in charge of the home, said the donations were “good for both sides as our children got to know that others think and care about them”.

The students, he said, benefitted by seeing that there are “people who are less fortunate than them. They [students] can run, walk and play while some of our children cannot”.

He was also of the view that the visit taught the students compassion.

Going by Nyangoma’s concerned exclamation of “My God, these children are not ok!” and other students’ pledge to continue helping now that they had seen how others lack, the visit taught compassion, indeed.

Source : The Observer

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