Dr Myles Munroe Turned Generations to God, Wealth

Bahamian televangelist, Dr Myles Munroe, who was last year hosted by the Uganda Jubilee Network and National Prayer Breakfast Uganda to evangelise and inspire businesspeople in two high-profile meetings, has died.

He and eight others, including his wife Ruth Munroe and their daughter, died when his plane crashed into a shipyard crane, while trying to land at the Grand Bahamas International airport in Freeport. He was on his way to the Global Leadership forum in Freeport.

Among his last media interviews was the one he gave at KTN’s JKL Show, where he spoke to Jeff Koinange about death, among other things.

“Die like the Apostle Paul who said ‘I have finished my course, I have kept the faith and I have been poured out like a drink offering. There is nothing left. I am ready to die’. That’s how I wanna die because there is nothing else for me,” he told the show’s host, Koinange. ”

When you die, die like I am planning to die. Empty. It’s finished.” Munroe, the founder of the Bahamas Faith Ministries, is a writer, preacher, thinker, leader, publisher and motivational speaker.

According to a biography on his website, the 60-year-old has published more than 100 spiritual and inspirational works and was a government and business consultant to Fortune 500 businesses. He has travelled to over 130 countries. At least 49 of his books that include Understanding the Purpose and Power of Women, Understanding the Purpose and Power of Men and The Most Important Person on Earth, were bestsellers.

The popular preacher rose from being an F student to owning a jet. Dr Munroe was born in the Bahamas in a family of 11 and lived in a wooden shack on the small West Indies island, where “people were so poor that they even didn’t know that they were poor”.

“Roaches and rats ran over our bodies as we slept,” he told Koinange.

At the age of 13, he started to question his life.

“I was born on an island with 96 per cent of the people black. But all the power and the economy was in the hands of white people who only formed four per cent.”

He asked his father, who was a Baptist preacher, why they could not go to the same schools, cinemas and drink from the same places like the white people. When his father failed to give him a satisfactory reply, he sought answers in the Bible.

“I took the Bible and read all the four gospels. By the time I was 14, I had read and memorised all of them. I told myself that everything was possible,” he said. “When I went to school, my white teacher told me I was a half human being, retarded, half-monkey, could not learn complicated things, nigger… I was an F student in his class. I went home and told my mother who encouraged me.”

Dr Munroe was to later realise that he held his own destiny.

“I went on to college, got three bachelor’s degrees in four years, a master’s in 18 months and five PhDs from five different universities,” he said.

Ugandan Footprints:

Many Ugandans will remember him for bringing their business acumen to the fore, through his involvement with network marketing ventures such as GNLD, while for many preachers, he is an unequalled anointed man of God – very successful, yet down to earth.

Juliet Mukulu and her husband Pastor Stephen Mukulu were in shock on Monday when the news broke.

“We were honoured to meet Dr Munroe for a few minutes at Shiloh [the annual prayer conference hosted by Bishop David Oyedepo in Nigeria] in 2006, when we were struggling with barrenness for 11 years then. He prayed for us and encouraged us. The following year, I conceived. I feel such pain at his death, yet in a way, I understand,” Juliet Mukulu told The Observer.

On December 31, 2013, in his New Year prophecies, Mukulu’s husband told the congregation at New Jerusalem Deliverance Centre International in Bunamwaya, God was taking one of His mighty servants home, this year. Some in the congregation later speculated, the elderly Billy Graham it surely must be.

Well, till we meet, Dr Munroe. Your footprints can never be erased. Like he famously once said: “The greatest tragedy in life is not death, but a life without a purpose.”

Additional information from the Internet.

Source : The Observer

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